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Regional ecosystem details for 7.2.2

Regional ecosystem 7.2.2
Vegetation Management Act class Of concern
Biodiversity status Endangered
Subregion 9, 1, 8, (2), (3), (6)
Estimated extent1 Pre-clearing 600 ha; Remnant 2017 400 ha
Extent in reserves High
Short description Notophyll to microphyll vine forest on sands of beach origin
Structure category Dense
Description Notophyll to microphyll vine forest. Species commonly include Cupaniopsis anacardioides, Diospyros geminata, Canarium australianum, Alphitonia excelsa, Acacia crassicarpa, A. mangium, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Pleiogynium timorense, Chionanthus ramiflorus, Blepharocarya involucrigera, Mimusops elengi, Polyalthia nitidissima, Millettia pinnata, Geijera salicifolia, Ficus opposita, Sersalisia sericea, Terminalia muelleri, T. arenicola, Drypetes deplanchei, and Exocarpos latifolius. Beach ridges and sand plains of beach origin. (BVG1M: 3a)

Vegetation communities in this regional ecosystem include:
7.2.2a: Notophyll vine forests, often with Acacia emergents. Species commonly include Cupaniopsis anacardioides, Diospyros geminata, Canarium australianum, Alphitonia excelsa, Acacia crassicarpa, Pleiogynium timorense, Chionanthus ramiflorus, Mimusops elengi, Polyalthia nitidissima, Millettia pinnata, Geijera salicifolia, Ficus opposita, Sersalisia sericea, Terminalia muelleri, T. arenicola, Drypetes deplanchei, and Exocarpos latifolius. Lowlands on dune sands, of the moist and dry rainfall zones. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2b: Closed scrub and low closed forest with Blepharocarya involucrigera, Atractocarpus sessilis, Choriceras tricorne, Endiandra glauca, Cyclophyllum multiflorum, Syzygium banksii, Polyscias australiana, Terminalia muelleri, Dillenia alata and Acacia polystachya. Dune sands. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2c: Simple notophyll vine forest dominated by Blepharocarya involucrigera. Sites subject to episodic disturbance or a seral stage of recovery from a single event or period of disturbance. Dune sands. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2d: Acacia mangium closed forest, with A. crassicarpa, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Cupaniopsis anacardioides, Planchonella obovata, Breynia cernua, Morinda citrifolia and Terminalia muelleri. Dune sands. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2e: Low notophyll vine thicket. Transported coastal cobble and boulder ridges. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2f: Microphyll vine thicket occurring in clumps/groves. Inter-grove areas are occupied by sparse grasses and herbs. Common tree species include Mimusops elengi, Terminalia muelleri, Diospyros compacta, Sersalisia sericea, Ficus obliqua, Pleiogynium timorense, Canarium australianum, Exocarpos latifolius, Celtis paniculata, Denhamia fasciculiflora, Brucea javanica, Ximenia americana, Acacia oraria, Acacia leptocarpa and Persoonia falcata. Coastal foredunes. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2g: Vine forest with Hibiscus tiliaceus and Calophyllum australianum. Intermittently inundated narrow dune swales. (BVG1M: 3a)
7.2.2h: Medium to tall semi-deciduous notophyll vine forest with species often including Melia azedarach, Pleiogynium timorense, Ganophyllum falcatum, Falcataria toona, Ficus racemosa, Argyrodendron polyandrum, and Alstonia scholaris. Dune sands. (BVG1M: 3a)
Supplementary description Stanton and Stanton (2005), D45, D7b, D281, G234, CG234, D235, D191, D185, D109; Kemp and Morgan (1999), 5; Kemp et al. (1999), 5; Tracey and Webb (1975), 7b
Protected areas Ngalba Bulal NP, Daintree NP, Girramay NP, Orpheus Island NP, Annan River (Yuku Baja-Muliku) RR, Brook Islands NP, Hinchinbrook Island NP, Goold Island NP, Halifax Bay Wetlands NP
Special values Important fruit source for birds, and very significant for many migratory species. High scenic value. 7.2.2e: A very rare and unusual landform.
Fire management guidelines STRATEGY: Do not burn deliberately. Mosaic burning in surrounding fire-adapted ecosystems will minimise spread and severity of wildfire during severe weather events. a,g: Do not burn deliberately. Limit fire encroachment from adjacent ecosystems by burning when conditions are favourable. Burn away from edges. d: Maintain appropriate mosaic burning in surrounding country. Do not protect from fire but do not burn deliberately. ISSUES: Occasional hot fires in adjoining communities may be required to prevent expansion of rainforest elements. Edges are generally self-protecting but back burning from rainforest edges may be desirable. The occurrence of high biomass grasses in or adjacent to rainforest may detrimentally affect rainforest during fire events associated with dry weather. a,g: Most plant species in this ecosystem are fire sensitive. Inappropriate fire may affect sensitive trees (e.g., coastal she-oaks), remove habitat trees, remove structurally complex understorey or promote weed invasion and erosion. d: This is mainly a self protecting community.
Comments 7.2.2: Includes unusual examples on Palm Island Group occurring on transported coastal granite cobble and boulder ridges adjacent to dunes. Residential development and widening of the Cook Highway between Oak Beach and White Cliffs are major threats. Information on condition and values of this regional ecosystem can be found in Lavarack (1991) and Hopkins et al. (1999). Guinea grass (Megathyrsus maximus) is invasive of disturbed areas, subsequently providing fuel for fires that are common in the surrounding woodlands. Lantana camara is also present, particularly in southern areas. 7.2.2a: Coastal margin, mainly north of Cairns or south of Ingham. 7.2.2b: Rare, along the coastal fringe in the north of the bioregion 7.2.2c: Coastal fringe in the north of the bioregion 7.2.2d: Coastal fringe, particularly in southern parts of the bioregion 7.2.2e: Occurs only on the Palm Island Group. 7.2.2f: Scattered along the coastal fringe of the bioregion 7.2.2g: Scattered along the coastal fringe of the bioregion 7.2.2h: Mapped only on Great Palm Island

1 Estimated extent is from version 11 pre-clearing and 2017 remnant regional ecosystem mapping. Figures are rounded for simplicity. For more precise estimates, including breakdowns by tenure and other themes see remnant vegetation in Queensland.

Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Last updated
16 April 2019
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