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Live air data

The Queensland Department of Environment and Science (DES) in collaboration with industry partners operates an air quality monitoring network across the state.

Data from the monitoring network is presented online as ambient concentration, air quality categories and smoke and dust health action levels which are updated hourly.

What’s new

Queensland has moved to using air quality categories rather than an air quality index as part of initiatives to ensure consistent air quality reporting across Australia. The category system colours provide users with general guidance on exposure risk during pollution events. Read more about air quality categories.

Health action level information is now presented using an improved layout on a separate smoke and dust health action levels page. The health action level ranges have been updated to reflect the latest Queensland Health recommendations.

The NEPM guidelines for ozone, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide have been updated to represent the latest national standards.

Thursday 21 October 2021 4am

Air quality data is available from 1 January 2016. Individual stations have been monitoring for different time periods so data may not be available for all possible times.

Metals

Legend to air quality category colours about category values

  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor
  • Very poor
  • Extremely poor

Select a value within the table to generate charts and to download air quality data.

Townsville
StationLead µg/m³24hr avg aboutArsenic µg/m³24hr avg aboutCadmium µg/m³24hr avg aboutCopper µg/m³24hr avg aboutZinc µg/m³24hr avg aboutNickel µg/m³24hr avg
Coastguard0.00100.0010.0020.0120
Lennon Drive0.00100.0010.0010.0110
Mount Isa
StationLead µg/m³24hr avg aboutArsenic µg/m³24hr avg aboutCadmium µg/m³24hr avg aboutCopper µg/m³24hr avg aboutZinc µg/m³24hr avg aboutNickel µg/m³24hr avg
The Gapofflineofflineofflineofflineofflineoffline

None of the data is validated (0% validated, 0/18 records)

The data used to compile this air quality information comes directly from the department's air monitoring network and has only undergone a preliminary quality check. Data is retrieved from the stations every hour and after quality checks, is available approximately 1 hour later.

All data on this site is shown in Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST).

  • An offline message in a cell indicates that measurements are temporarily unavailable due to equipment servicing or failure. See network status.

About air quality categories

Air quality categories are used to make it easier to interpret air quality data by reducing the complexity associated with different pollutant concentration units and air quality guideline values.

Each air quality measurement from a monitoring station is assigned an air quality category rating based on comparison of the measurement value against the relevant air quality guideline. Five colour-coded air quality categories are used, being 'Good' (green), 'Fair' (yellow), 'Poor' (orange), 'Very Poor' (red) or 'Extremely Poor' (dark red). Values greater than the air quality guideline will be appear as ‘Poor’, ‘Very Poor’ or ‘Extremely Poor’.

More information about air quality categories.

About these Metals parameters

Lead

Lead is commonly used in manufacturing products like batteries and solders. The major emission source is from the mining, smelting and processing of mineral ores. Inhaling or consuming lead and its compounds can affect the human body, particularly the nervous system, and may result in growth and developmental problems in children.

The guideline for Lead is 2µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Lead is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Lead

Arsenic

Elemental arsenic does not occur naturally but its compounds are widespread, often occurring with metal-bearing ores and released during processing. It is widely used in timber preservatives and pesticides, and is well-documented as an occupational hazard.

The guideline for Arsenic is 0.3µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Arsenic is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Arsenic

Cadmium

Cadmium compounds occur naturally in the environment, particularly in areas of mineralisation. The major emission source is the processing of metal ores for lead, zinc and copper, where cadmium is a valuable by-product.

The guideline for Cadmium is 2µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Cadmium is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Cadmium

Copper

Copper is one of a number of essential metals, and a small daily intake is required to maintain a healthy life. However, ingesting high levels of the element can lead to adverse health effects, as some of its compounds are toxic.

The guideline for Copper is 50µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Copper is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Copper

Zinc

Zinc occurs widely in nature, and is another metal essential in trace quantities for good health. Exposure to elevated levels is more likely through occupational exposure in industry such as mining and smelting and processing of metal ores. Insufficient zinc intake has a detrimental effect on growth, and immune and reproductive system development. Adverse health effects generally only occur where the exposure is high.

The guideline for Zinc is 120µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Zinc is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Zinc

Nickel

The guideline for Nickel is 0.12µg/m³ (24hr avg).

Nickel is measured in micrograms per cubic metre.

More information about Nickel

Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Last updated
21 October 2021
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